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First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Studies (2019)

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This curriculum policy replaces The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 10: Native Studies, 1999 and The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12: Native Studies, 2000. All courses in First Nations, Métis, and Inuit studies (formerly named “Native studies”) are now based on the expectations outlined in this curriculum policy.

Citizenship Education in the First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Studies Curriculum

The responsible, active citizen participates in the community for the common good. Citizenship education provides ways in which young people are prepared and consequently ready and able to undertake their roles as citizens”.  

Julian Fraillon and Wolfram Schulz,
“Concept and Design of the International Civic and Citizenship Study” (2008)


Citizenship education is an important facet of students’ overall education. In the First Nations, Métis, and Inuit studies curriculum, students are given opportunities to learn about what it means to be a responsible, active citizen in the community of the classroom and the diverse communities to which they belong within and outside the school. It is important for students to understand that they belong to many communities and that, ultimately, they are all citizens of the global community.

All subjects in the First Nations, Métis, and Inuit studies curriculum provide multiple opportunities to incorporate aspects of citizenship education, with particular consideration given to concepts of importance to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities, including, but not limited to, reciprocity, reconciliation, justice, and truth.

This diagram presents a framework for citizenship education. In this figure, the outer circle lists the four main elements of citizenship education: active participation, identity, attributes, and structures, and describes each element. The second circle outlines ways in which students may develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes associated with responsible citizenship. The innermost circle lists various terms and topics that are related to citizenship education.

This diagram presents a framework for citizenship education. (See below for the same information in tabular form.) In this figure:

  • the outer circle lists the four main elements of citizenship education – active participation, identity, attributes, and structures – and describes each element;
  • the second circle outlines ways in which students may develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes associated with responsible citizenship. Teachers should ensure that students have opportunities to develop these attitudes, understandings, and practices as they work to achieve the expectations in the subjects that make up the First Nations, Métis, and Inuit studies curriculum (and those in other subjects as well);
  • the innermost circle lists various terms and topics that are related to citizenship education. Teachers may focus on these terms/topics when making connections between citizenship education and expectations in the First Nations, Métis, and Inuit studies curriculum – in particular terms such as “truth”, “reciprocity”, and “reconciliation” – as well as expectations in other curriculum documents. In the figure, each term/topic in the innermost circle is connected to a specific element within the framework. However, it is important to note that, in practice, a term can be applied to more than one element – as the dotted lines imply – and that a number of terms may be woven together in a unit that incorporates citizenship education.